Archives de catégorie : Non classé

Prospective Cohort Study of the Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Treatments Used in the “Real World”

NOT Vape-related

To estimate the “real-world” effectiveness of commonly used aids to smoking cessation in England by using longitudinal data.

Published: October 2014

Positive: N/A

Link to publication: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(14)00629-6/fulltext

Authors

Daniel Kotz, PhD
Jamie Brown, PhD
Robert West, PhD


Summary

Patients and Methods

We conducted a prospective cohort study in 1560 adult smokers who participated in an English national household survey in the period from November 2006 to March 2012, responded to a 6-month follow-up survey, and made at least 1 quit attempt between the 2 measurements. The quitting method was classified as follows: (1) prescription medication (nicotine replacement therapy [NRT], bupropion, or varenicline) in combination with specialist behavioral support delivered by a National Health Service Stop Smoking Service; (2) prescription medication with brief advice; (3) NRT bought over the counter; (4) none of these. The primary outcome measure was self-reported abstinence up to the time of the 6-month follow-up survey, adjusted for key potential confounders including cigarette dependence.

Results

Compared with smokers using none of the cessation aids, the adjusted odds of remaining abstinent up to the time of the 6-month follow-up survey were 2.58 (95% CI, 1.48-4.52) times higher in users of prescription medication in combination with specialist behavioral support and 1.55 (95% CI, 1.11-2.16) times higher in users of prescription medication with brief advice. The use of NRT bought over the counter was associated with a lower odds of abstinence (odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49-0.94).


Conclusions

Prescription medication offered with specialist behavioral support and that offered with minimal behavioral support are successful methods of stopping cigarette smoking in England.

Continuer la lecture de Prospective Cohort Study of the Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Treatments Used in the “Real World”