Archives de catégorie : Arrêt / Cessation

Utilité de la vape pour l’arrêt du tabac
Utility of vaping for tobacco cessation

Effectiveness of the Electronic Cigarette: An Eight-Week Flemish Study with Six-Month Follow-up on Smoking Reduction, Craving and Experienced Benefits and Complaints

Background: Smoking reduction remains a pivotal issue in public health policy, but quit rates obtained with traditional quit-smoking therapies remain disappointingly low. Tobacco Harm Reduction (THR), aiming at less harmful ways of consuming nicotine, may provide a more effective alternative. One promising candidate for THR are electronic cigarettes (e-cigs). The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of second-generation e-cigs both in terms of acute craving-reduction in the lab and in terms of smoking reduction and experienced benefits/complaints in an eight-month Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT).

Published: 29 October 2014

Positive: Yes

Link to publication: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/11/11220/htm

Dr Farsalinos comments on the study: http://www.ecigarette-research.com/web/index.php/2013-04-07-09-50-07/2014/186-ecig-rct

Authors

Karolien Adriaens
Dinska Van Gucht
Paul Declerk
Frank Baeyens


Summary

Abstract

: Background: Smoking reduction remains a pivotal issue in public health policy, but quit rates obtained with traditional quit-smoking therapies remain disappointingly low. Tobacco Harm Reduction (THR), aiming at less harmful ways of consuming nicotine, may provide a more effective alternative. One promising candidate for THR are electronic cigarettes (e-cigs). The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of second-generation e-cigs both in terms of acute craving-reduction in the lab and in terms of smoking reduction and experienced benefits/complaints in an eight-month Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT).

Design: RCT with three arms.

Methods: Participants (N = 48) unwilling to quit smoking were randomized into two e-cig groups and one control group. During three lab sessions (over two months) participants, who had been abstinent for four hours, vaped/smoked for five minutes, after which we monitored the effect on craving and withdrawal symptoms. eCO and saliva cotinine levels were also measured. In between lab sessions, participants in the e-cig groups could use e-cigs or smoke ad libitum, whereas the control group could only smoke. After the lab sessions, the control group also received an e-cig. The RCT included several questionnaires, which repeatedly monitored the effect of ad libitum e-cig use on the use of tobacco cigarettes and the experienced benefits/complaints up to six months after the last lab session.

Results: From the first lab session on, e-cig use after four hours of abstinence resulted in a reduction in cigarette craving which was of the same magnitude as when a cigarette was smoked, while eCO was unaffected. After two months, we observed that 34% of the e-cig groups had stopped smoking tobacco cigarettes, versus 0% of the control group. After five months, the e-cig groups demonstrated a total quit-rate of 37%, whereas the control group showed a quit rate of 38% three months after initiating e-cig use. At the end of the eight-month study, 19% of the e-cig groups and 25% of the control group were totally abstinent from smoking, while an overall reduction of 60% in the number of cigarettes smoked per day was observed (compared to intake). eCO levels decreased, whereas cotinine levels were the same in all groups at each moment of measurement. Reported benefits far outweighed the reported complaints.


Conclusion

Conclusion: In a series of controlled lab sessions with e-cig naïve tobacco smokers, second generation e-cigs were shown to be immediately and highly effective in reducing abstinence induced cigarette craving and withdrawal symptoms, while not resulting in increases in eCO. Remarkable (>50 pc) eight-month reductions in, or complete abstinence from tobacco smoking was achieved with the e-cig in almost half (44%) of the participants.

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Real-world effectiveness of e-cigarettes when used to aid smoking cessation: a cross-sectional population study

Vape Vs NRTs Vs cold turkey. 20% cessation with vape, 10% with NRTs

Published: 12 May 2014

Positive: Yes

Link to publication: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/add.12623/pdf

Link to press release (FR): http://www.pourquoidocteur.fr/La-e-cigarette-fait-la-preuve-de-son-efficacite-pour-arreter-de-fumer–7757.html

Authors:

Jamie Brown

Emma Beard

Daniel Kotz

Susan Michie

Robert West


Summary

Background and Aims

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are rapidly increasing in popularity. Two randomized controlled trials have suggested that e-cigarettes can aid smoking cessation, but there are many factors that could influence their real-world effectiveness.

This study aimed to assess, using an established methodology, the effectiveness of e-cigarettes when used to aid smoking cessation compared with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) bought over-the-counter and with unaided quitting in the general population.

Design and Setting

A large cross-sectional survey of a representative sample of the English population.

Participants

The study included 5863 adults who had smoked within the previous 12 months and made at least one quit attempt during that period with either an e-cigarette only(n=464), NRT bought over-the-counter only (n=1922) or no aid in their most recent quit attempt (n=3477).

Measurements

The primary outcome was self-reported abstinence up to the time of the survey, adjusted for key potential confounders including nicotine dependence.

Findings

E-cigarette users were more likely to report abstinence than either those who used NRT bought over-the-counter [odds ratio (OR)=2.23, 95% confidence interval(CI)=1.70–2.93, 20.0 versus 10.1%] or no aid (OR=1.38, 95% CI=1.08–1.76, 20.0 versus 15.4%). The adjusted odds of non-smoking in users of e-cigarettes were 1.63 (95% CI=1.17–2.27) times higher compared with users of NRT bought over-the-counter and 1.61 (95% CI=1.19–2.18) times higher compared with those using no aid


Conclusion

Among smokers who have attempted to stop without professional support, those who use e-cigarettes are more likely to report continued abstinence than those who used a licensed NRT product bought over-the-counter or no aid to cessation. This difference persists after adjusting for a range of smoker characteristics such as nicotine dependence


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Effectiveness and tolerability of electronic cigarette in real-life: a 24-month prospective observational study

This prospective observational study evaluated smoking  reduction/abstinence in smokers not intending to quit using an e-Cigarette (‘Categoria’; Arbi Group, Italy).

Published 20 July 2013

Positive: Yes

Link to publication: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11739-013-0977-z

Authors

  • Riccardo Polosa,
  • Jaymin B. Morjaria,
  • Pasquale Caponnetto,
  • Davide Campagna,
  • Cristina Russo,
  • Angela Alamo,
  • MariaDomenica Amaradio,
  • Alfredo Fisichella

 

Summary

Electronic cigarettes (e-Cigarette) are battery-operated devices designed to vaporise nicotine that may aid smokers to quit or reduce their cigarette consumption. Research on e-Cigarettes is urgently needed to ensure that the decisions of regulators, healthcare providers and consumers are evidence based. Here we assessed long-term effectiveness and tolerability of e-Cigarette used in a ‘naturalistic’ setting. This prospective observational study evaluated smoking reduction/abstinence in smokers not intending to quit using an e-Cigarette (‘Categoria’; Arbi Group, Italy). After an intervention phase of 6 months, during which e-Cigarette use was provided on a regular basis, cigarettes per day (cig/day) and exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO) levels were followed up in an observation phase at 18 and 24 months. Efficacy measures included: (a) ≥50 % reduction in the number of cig/day from baseline, defined as self-reported reduction in the number of cig/day (≥50 %) compared to baseline; (b) ≥80 % reduction in the number of cig/day from baseline, defined as self-reported reduction in the number of cig/day (≥80 %) compared to baseline; (c) abstinence from smoking, defined as complete self-reported abstinence from tobacco smoking (together with an eCO concentration of ≤10 ppm). Smoking reduction and abstinence rates were computed, and adverse events reviewed.


 

Conclusion

Of the 40 subjects, 17 were lost to follow-up at 24 months. A >50 % reduction in the number of cig/day at 24 months was shown in 11/40 (27.5 %) participants with a median of 24 cig/day use at baseline decreasing significantly to 4 cig/day (p = 0.003). Smoking abstinence was reported in 5/40 (12.5 %) participants while combined >50 % reduction and smoking abstinence was observed in 16/40 (40 %) participants at 24 months. Five subjects stopped e-Cigarette use (and stayed quit), three relapsed back to tobacco smoking and four upgraded to more performing products by 24 months. Only some mouth irritation, throat irritation, and dry cough were reported. Withdrawal symptoms were uncommon. Long-term e-Cigarette use can substantially decrease cigarette consumption in smokers not willing to quit and is well tolerated.


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